Margo Price – All American Made

First taster of Margo Price’s forthcoming album, All American Made is out in October on Third Man Records, there’s a tasty vinyl special edition available, sky-blue coloured with an alternate LP jacket, you can get a copy here

Margo Price returns with a stunning second album that was recorded at Sam Phillips Recording (Memphis, TN) by Matt Ross-Spang (Jason Isbell, Zac Brown Band). It features Willie Nelson on Learning to Lose and Hometown. A lot can change in a year: markets boom and bust, trends come and go, presidents get elected. In 2015, Margo Price was a country underdog just trying to keep enough gas in the tank to get to the next gig, but by the end of 2016, she was one of the genre’s most celebrated new artists and a ubiquitous presence on late night television and at major festivals around the world. It’s the kind of year most musicians can only dream of, and the arrival of Price’s spectacular sophomore album, All American Made proves that she hasn’t taken a moment of it for granted. Delivering on the promise of her debut and then some, the record finds Price planting her flag firmly in the soil as a songwriter who’s here for the long haul, one with the chops to hang with the greats she so often finds herself sharing stages with these days.

Photo by: Angelina Castillo


A prolific writer with a knack for candid self-reflection, Price has never had to look too far for inspiration, and on All American Made, she and her songwriting partner/ husband, Jeremy Ivey, continue to depict the trials of everyday life with unflinching honesty, painting poetically plainspoken portraits of men and women just trying to get by. Highs and lows, long nights and hard days, wild women and cocaine cowboys, politics and sexism, it’s all in there, singularly filtered through Price’s wry, no-bullshit perspective. Throughout the album, her contemporary take on classic sounds is at once familiar and daring, an infectious blend of Nashville country, Memphis soul, and Texas twang that tips its cap to everyone from Waylon and Willie (who makes a guest appearance) to Loretta and Dolly, all while flipping a middle finger to the cookie-cutter pop that dominates modern country radio. Rich with swirling pedal steel, honky-tonk rhythms, and Price’s stop-you-in-your-tracks vocals, All American Made is deeply reverent of tradition even as it challenges conventions, a nuanced exploration of conflicted emotions for our deeply conflicted times.

Here’s a version of the title track by Margo’s former band Buffalo Clover

Margo Price / Facebook / Twitter

Beat Surrender – Best of 2016 – Singer/Songwriter, Folk, Country & Americana – #10 to 1

#10

Vanessa Peters – The Burden of Unshakeable Proof

#9

Applewood Road – S/T

#8

Lori McKenna – The Bird & The Rifle

#7

case / lang / viers – S/T

#6

Sturgill Simpson – A Sailor Guide To Earth

#5

The Handsome Family – Unseen

#4

Kelsey Waldon – I’ve Got A Way


#3

Richmond Fontaine

You Can’t Go Back If There’s Nothing to Go Back To

#2

Drive-by Truckers – American Band

#1

Margo Price – Midwest Farmers Daughter

Margo Price: NPR Music Tiny Desk Concert



Bob Boilen | November 28, 2016 — When I greeted Margo Price in the NPR garage before her Tiny Desk performance, tears were streaming down her face. It was Wednesday morning, Nov. 9, the day after the 2016 election. For her — as for many Americans — it was a stunning and bewildering moment in time, a day when life and the everyday took on new meaning. And so when she and her band began to play “All American Made,” a song she’s sung many times before, those words about America’s changes and failures in the 21st century seemed even more powerful.

Margo Price is a Nashville-based musician, the sort of country artist that captures the hearts of those both inside and outside the country-music scene. Her debut album, Midwest Farmer’s Daughter, is one of the brightest moments in country in a very strong year.

As this Tiny Desk progresses, even “Four Years Of Chances,” her song of a love gone wrong, feels less about a lousy husband and more about presidential politics. She dedicates her third and final song, “About To Find Out,” to Donald Trump; she says it was originally written about a “musician acquaintance of mine who’s a complete sociopath.” When the song ends, she rips open her red cowboy shirt to reveal a T-shirt with the words “Icky Trump”— a play on the title of The White Stripes’ song “Icky Thump,” which criticizes the U.S.’s immigration policies. She smiles, wipes a tear away: It seems cathartic, but temporary.

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